Archives

Diphtheria

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Tetanus

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Polio

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Tuberculosis

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Shingles

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Meningitis B

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Human Papilloma Virus

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Chickenpox

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Yellow Fever

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Typhoid

Typhoid and paratyphoid are infections caused by the bacteria Salmonella Typhi or Salmonella Paratyphi.

They cause very similar diseases collectively known as enteric fever. It can be life-threatening unless treated promptly with antibiotics. The disease can last up to several weeks. If treated most people will make a full recovery however if untreated death rates can be high.1

Tick-borne Encephalitis

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Rabies

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Measles, Mumps ans Rubella (MMR)

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Japanese Encephalitis

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Hepatitis B

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Hepatitis A

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Cholera

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Pneumococcal Pneumonia

Pneumococcal Pneumonia

Pneumococcal disease is caused by the bacterium Streptococcus pneumonia. Pneumococcal infections usually fall into one of two categories:

  • Non-invasive pneumococcal infection – these occur outside the major organs or the blood and tend to be less serious. These can include bronchitis, ear infections and sinusitis.
  • Invasive pneumococcal infections – these occur inside a major organ or the blood and tend to be more serious such as infections of the blood, bone, joints, lungs and brain.

Invasive pneumococcal infection is a major cause of disease and death globally and in the UK.

The following is a summary about the disease. For further details speak to your local pharmacist or GP.

Meningococcal Meningitis

Meningococcal Meningitis

Meningococcal disease is a serious disease caused by the bacterium Neisseria meningitidis. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), meningitis is fatal in 50% of untreated cases.

Approximately 10-20% of the general UK population carry the bacteria at the back of their nose and throat. Carriers do not have symptoms but can develop the disease when the bacteria invade the bloodstream from the back of the nose and throat. Rarely it can progress to septicaemia (blood poisoning) or meningitis (infection of the lining of the brain).

There are 12 different types of N. meningitidis and out of these, 6 are responsible for the majority of invasive disease: A, B, C, W, X and Y. Effective vaccinations are available against groups A, B, C, W and Y.1

The following is a summary about the disease. For further details speak to your local pharmacist or GP.

Girl suffering from flu lying under a warm blanket holding a tissue

Flu

Flu (influenza) is a viral infection of the respiratory tract. In healthy individuals flu usually resolves without treatment within 1-2 weeks. It can cause significant health problems in people with pre-existing medical conditions such as asthma, COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder), diabetes and heart conditions.

The following is a summary about the disease. For further details speak to your local pharmacist or GP.

 

Malaria

Malaria

Malaria is a potentially serious parasitic infection spread through the bite of an infected female Anopheles mosquito. The disease is caused by 5 different species, however Plasmodium falciparum is the most common malaria parasite on the African continent and is responsible for the most severe form of malaria and the most deaths. Outside of sub-Saharan Africa, P. vivax is the dominant malaria parasite in most countries. Malaria is preventable and curable if diagnosed and treated promptly. A single bite is all it takes for someone to be infected.1

The following is a summary about the disease. For further details speak to your local pharmacist or GP.